Three Reasons the U.S. is Built for Remote Success


U.S. is built for remote work

We’re in what may be a ‘new normal’. COVID-19 has forced businesses around the globe, that are able, to adopt remote work policies for their employees. For many companies, this is uncharted territory.

In the U.S. tech industry, remote work isn’t a stretch. Companies have been experimenting with the idea for quite some time with increasing levels of success. But to be successful in a remote working environment, there are certain critical infrastructure and cultural points that must be met. As a result, the U.S. geography is well positioned to succeed in a remote work environment.

Infrastructure

The U.S. has great infrastructure. From reliable power grids to fast internet, and soon to be faster with 5G, we are leading in many areas that are critical for success in a modern work environment.

Internet speeds and availability are two of the key points that demonstrate America’s strong position. According to data, U.S. broadband speeds are some of the fastest in the world. Beyond speed, there is nearly ubiquitous access to high-speed internet, which showcases an infrastructure that can handle the shifting workforce needs.

In many popular offshore areas, data and development centers have dedicated broadband pipelines, but during a crisis when a center must close, there are limited options to maintain operations. Quite simply, there is not enough infrastructure to support a remote working environment at scale.

The U.S. has the infrastructure to be successful, meet customer needs and innovate.

Distribution of Workforce

In the U.S. there is tech talent throughout the country. That means you can find technology professionals from the East to the West Coast and all the “flyover states” in between. Just look at Rural Sourcing. We have six software development centers in Middle America—outside of the traditional tech hubs.

Our talent isn’t clustered in massive centers. We’ve found that having smaller centers, maxing out at 150 colleagues, is the ideal size to promote collaboration, innovation, and culture. We have talent spread out across the country, allowing us to provide a stable, high-quality, and committed workforce. That means less risk and better results.

Smaller Learning Curve

Remote work is nothing new for the U.S. A Gallup study finds that 43% of U.S. employees work remotely some or all of the time. Culturally, we have embraced the model for a number of years. Not at this scale, but the learning curve is small for a remote work culture.

Beyond the volume of people already working remotely, numerous studies have shown that remote workers are more productive and profitable than in-house employees. The workforce is there and able to meet customer needs.

Whether the remote work is a temporary or permanent fixture of our economic landscape, the onshore development model is well positioned to thrive. We are ready and able to get the job done—on time, on budget and in your backyard.


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