5 Disadvantages of Offshoring

Offshoring and outsourcing are two popular business models that have grown in recent times as businesses look to reduce costs, streamline processes, reach organizational goals and reap the benefits of specialization. However, many organizations have learned that there are several disadvantages to offshoring. If you are considering offshoring for your business, it's best to do your homework. What's the Difference between Offshoring and Outsourcing? Before diving into the disadvantages of offshoring, it's important to understand the differences between offshoring and outsourcing. In recent years, these two terms have been used interchangeably because some of the aspects of each of these processes are present in the other. Outsourcing is a practice used by companies to transfer portions of work to outside suppliers rather than completing it internally. Companies may be motivated to outsource work for a variety of reasons. The most significant factors usually relate to cutting costs and reducing internal infrastructure. Outsourcing is an "umbrella" term, and while the process has been used for years in functions like accounting and legal, it has become wildly popular in software development and support. Offshoring happens when you relocate the work to a different country and is a form of outsourcing. For example, offshoring could be when a company from within the United States may work with a company located in India or China for a specific project. So, offshoring is always outsourcing – but not all outsourcing is offshore. Get it? In many cases, these companies look to take advantage of a much cheaper labor market. However, there are several hurdles and risks involved with offshoring. Disadvantages of Offshoring Time Zone Differences One of the biggest disadvantages of offshoring is the time zone differences. Many offshoring companies operate within a 5-12-hour difference from their client. Work schedules may need to be adjusted to accommodate time zone differences when working with offshore companies. Furthermore, unless your offshore partner commits to staffing late night shifts that work with your company's time zone, you may have to wait for responses from the offshore staff. These time differences can also lead to lengthy delays in project deadlines as both companies struggle to accommodate one another. Misaligned work schedules cause internal friction as the staff must tolerate unnatural working hours that also do not provide the responsiveness and speed required in the digital economy.   Communication and Language Issues When working with a company from a different country, it is usually safe to assume that most people on your team speak English as a second language. When working with someone who natively speaks another language, this can make communication and collaboration a unique challenge even if they speak English with relative proficiency. For example, some accents are difficult to understand when speaking another language (such as accents of various Indian dialects). So, even though a team can speak English very well (which is impressive in and of itself), that does not mean that communication will be as smooth as it is when communicating with someone who is a native speaker. Cultural and Social Differences Even if the language barrier can be overcome or minimized, an overseas team can have cultural and social practices that you will have to accommodate. For example, if you contract an agency from India, they can have up to sixteen public holidays a year depending on their regional location. Couple that with the US's ten public holidays, and that is twenty-six days a year that rarely coincide. While members of the team might tolerate Christmas Day conference calls, it's more "Bah, Humbug" than "Happy Holidays." So, you must consider the impact of the fragmented calendar during the project and it will affect your deadline. Work styles will exhibit social differences. For example, it is considered acceptable and expected for a North American worker to be assertive and straight-forward. However, this is not always the case in other cultures which view the employer-employee relationship very differently. These cultural variations dilute the valuable input and feedback loops expected in Western business. The discrepancies in culture and social practices can also lead to a lack of understanding of a complex business problems which in turn leads to business and personal misunderstandings and challenges that would not be the case when everyone on a team has a similar understanding of the project and overall business dynamic. Increase Domestic Unemployment Critics of offshoring note thatthe level of unemployment of the local economy increases. For example, if you outsource jobs to India, there is less opportunity and open positions for qualified Americans, which can hurt the national economy and livelihood of cities and towns across the country. By choosing a provider in the US, that creates more open positions for qualified local individuals and keeps more money circulating in the US as opposed to sending it overseas. Proximity Thinking about visiting your offshoring partner? This could be difficult considering the distance, costs, and time spent traveling to an overseas location. If meeting with your partner and having any face time is essential to your company, offshoring may not be the right fit for your business' needs.   Geopolitical Unrest The unstable political climate in prominent outsourcing countries can causeincreasing geopolitical risks for businesses. The Philippines, one of the world's most popular outsourcing locations, is frequently a victim of political unrest which seems to flare up without warning. This is true of many developing countries that are generally go-tos when looking to outsource work. Whether the issue is a government shutdown, military coup, riots over an election, or pressure involving drug cartels – all of these "far away" issues could quickly become much more real when your project or business is directly impacted because of the fallout. An Offshoring Alternative: Onshoring within the United States Fortunately, there's no need to look overseas for quality software services. A simpler and more effective outsourcing alternative is onshoring. Onshoring is a business practice where companies source services from within their own country. Onshoring is highly effective. Onshoring offers improved communication and increased productivity between both parties, while still working to reduce costs. It also eliminates the risks of compromised IP and data, geopolitical uncertainty and contextual misalignment. For example, a company located in Los Angeles or New York City can reduce costs by contracting services from a company located in smaller cities in New Mexico or the South, where living costs and prices are much lower. The blend of finding quality talent at an affordable price point is quite advantageous for companies located within the United States. By working with a company located in the same country, both parties will benefit from more convenient time zones, faster and cheaper business travel, and easier collaboration. Rural Sourcing: The Nation's Leading Onshoring Partner If you’re looking for an offshore alternative for your organization's IT solutions, Rural Sourcing can help. As the leader in domestic sourcing, Rural Sourcing's innovative domestic model eliminates the obstacles of data security, IP protection, political concern, time zones, distance, language barriers, and more. We help bring jobs back to the United States and provide high-quality work at a fraction of the price of providers in major metro areas. With development centers strategically located throughout the United States, Rural Sourcing provides world-class solutions for organizations across various industries including pharmaceutical, healthcare, hi-tech, insurance, and consumer & retail goods. Get in touch with us today to learn more about our capabilities and to see how we can help your business outsource responsibly and economically without compromising quality.

What Exactly is Nearshoring?

As organizations seek out solutions to save on overhead and labor costs while continuing to scale, outsourcing has grown in popularity. Outsourcing has been an effective model that allows companies the option to adjust their resources to improve productivity and efficiency while giving them the opportunity to focus on their core competencies. It allows businesses to save on direct and indirect recruiting and labor costs. While overseas companies used to be the preferred choice for outsourcing as it offered the lowest cost alternative, many organizations have started to realize the unique challenges associated with offshoring and have started looking for an option that saves money and cuts down on the headaches involved. One of the options many companies consider is nearshoring. Nearshoring is a type of offshoring that occurs when an organization decides to outsource work to companies that are geographically nearer (hence the word "near") to them than some of the previously popular countries in Asia and Eastern Europe. For example, instead of offshoring development work to India which is between 9-12 hours ahead of the US, a company might choose a company in Central America, thus cutting the time difference down so work can take place in relatively real time. However, although nearshoring allows two companies to be in more similar time zones, this doesn't solve all problems with overseas outsourcing – just one of them. Nearshoring still presents contextual, cultural, and language challenges as well as those of cybersecurity, IP protection, and political uncertainty. Companies need to be aware of these dangers before considering this option for outsourcing any projects. In this blog, we explore nearshoring in depth, including its benefits and drawbacks, and how it differs from other outsourcing models. Nearshoring vs. Offshoring As companies sought out solutions for reducing operating costs and gaining greater operational scalability, many organizations looked to other countries overseas such as India, China, and Russia to outsource their activities, otherwise known as offshoring. Offshoring takes place across national borders and can be a cost-effective solution as offshore companies are willing to set lower hourly rates that are more in line with their cost living. For example, India became popular for knowledge-based offshoring (the best example being technology related) as India combines a relatively educated workforce with low wages. China became popular for manufacturing types of offshoring, with a lower skilled workforce and an even lower incomes. However, although offshoring is a cheaper option, there are many drawbacks. Offshoring can present many communication issues, as language and cultural barriers can get in the way of effective communication and put a strain on the workforce. Plus, deadlines are often extended due to the large gap in time zones, making it difficult to collaborate, stay on schedule, and communicate in real time. Tomorrow can mean different things in different parts of the world. Combine these significant intangible hazards with the material presence of risks around cyber-security, IP protection and economic and political stability, and risk soon outweighs a perceived lower price with uncertain delivery. Many United States-based companies wanted quicker turnaround times, which is why they started looking for partners that were located a bit closer to home. The Nearshoring Advantage The biggest benefit of nearshoring is that the organizations are physically closer, reducing time zone discrepancies. Fewer time zones differences allow teams to make faster decisions to stay on schedule and reduce delays. Closer time-zone alignment greatly enables operational cohesion, effectiveness, and team camaraderie. The geographic proximity improves productivity in both teams as they will no longer have to shift their hours to accommodate the outsourced employee group. Finally, travel between locations is made much easier under the nearshore model, making team interaction and regular inspection much easier. What are the Disadvantages of Nearshoring? As with any business model, it's important to be aware of the challenges associated with nearshoring. While nearshoring solves most time zone barriers, it doesn't quite answer all of the challenges that operating in an international context – usually with developing countries - presents. Different countries will have varying national holidays, languages, and cultural differences that can prove a challenge to efficient working and communications. For example, a US-based company that works with a Mexican or Central American company may run into some language barriers, which can make communication a challenge. National holidays can be different between US and Mexico-based companies, which can lengthen deadlines and delay turnaround time. Differences in work schedules can also prove to be a challenge, as typical work days may vary between countries. Furthermore, it's also important to consider any new laws and regulations you'll need to adhere to when working with a company in another country, which can prove to be a challenge. Finally, nearshoring does not inspire much more confidence around geopolitical balance, the threat of compromised IP, or the management of sensitive data. Frankly, nearshoring is illusory in its ability to solve the problems of delivering high-quality software, cost effectively, at the required speed with an acceptable amount of risk. Onshoring: An Alternative to Nearshoring While nearshoring brings two companies closer in proximity, this business model certainly isn't fool-proof. There are many language and cultural considerations that can lead to delays and problematic communication and navigating a nearshoring partnership - and the regulations associated with it - can be tricky. The real reason people opt for nearshore is nothing to do with the business conditions. It's just more fun, or at least less onerous, to travel "nearshore" to inspect their teams on a regular basis. Let's face it; most people would prefer a few days in Central, South America or The Caribbean than a quarterly 24-hour trek (maybe in coach) halfway around the world for a ten-day tour of duty inspecting your offshore resources in a far-flung country that feels as culturally uncomfortable as it is geographically remote. Fortunately, there is a solution that provides businesses with a cost-effective alternative to nearshoring and overcomes any apprehensions with cultural barriers and delays. Onshoring, also known as domestic sourcing, is when a firm seeks out services from a partner within the same country. For example, a company in Los Angeles may look to an IT group in New Mexico or Georgia for help with a project as the cost of living offers more affordable rates in these areas than Southern California. Onshoring cuts down on time zone concerns, language, and cultural barriers as well as preserving the rule of law over IP and data security. You can benefit from real-time collaboration and produce a high-quality product within budget, on schedule, and at the speed that modern business demands. With onshoring, you'll be less likely to encounter delays that would typically occur with cultural and language barriers associated with nearshoring so that you can get to market faster with a high-quality product at an affordable price. You'll also support jobs in your own country, so you can feel good about creating opportunities close to home. Rural Sourcing: The Leader of Remote Delivery IT Services Rural Sourcing is the leader in remote software development. To help companies lower their costs and create high-quality products, Rural Sourcing's innovative onshore model allows you to benefit from talented, qualified IT teams living in mid-sized and small cities across the United States. With our onshoring services, you'll eliminate time zones, language barriers, cultural differences, and delays to speed up deadlines and improve collaboration. If you think onshoring can benefit your organization, get in touch with our team today.

Onshoring, Offshoring, Nearshoring and Outsourcing: What’s the Difference?

One of the biggest challenges companies face is finding ways to scale while being as efficient and productive as possible. Perhaps a company is looking to launch a new app, enhance their business intelligence, or has another significant software project that needs to be completed, but they don't have the staff or resources in-house. Many leaders and executives find the idea of developing an in-house team to be too expensive, especially if they are in a major US city where salaries can be high and competition for top talent fierce. In addition to being costly, hiring new staff can be time-consuming, and companies may not even have the recruiting resources to find qualified candidates. In many cases, these companies end up turning to more cost-effective alternatives that provide flexibility and convenient solutions for their needs, one of which is outsourcing. There are many ways to outsource a project – such as onshoring, offshoring, and nearshoring - each with its benefits and challenges. While all three of these most popular types of outsourcing models are similar, they differ in a variety of ways. The Basics: What is Outsourcing Let's start with the "simplest" term, outsourcing, as it has set the foundation for onshoring, nearshoring, and offshoring. Outsourcing is when you find a third-party company or individual to complete a specific project or many projects instead of completing the work in-house. There may be many reasons a company looks for outside help. They may not have the capabilities, breadth of knowledge or experience, or are looking to manage costs and simplify the process from idea to completed product. Not only does this open the door to new opportunities and experts with a breadth of capabilities, but outsourcing also gives you the flexibility to work with an outside firm for a project under a specific period and then move on to completion of the project. For example, your company may need assistance on a huge project, like developing an app, but may not need the additional resources once the project is complete. Plus, it will cut down on the need to hire individual's in-house, minimizing recruitment and operational costs associated with finding qualified applicants in your area (or moving expenses if you need to recruit specialists from other parts of the country). One of the significant benefits of outsourcing is that you'll work with experienced vendors who specialize in a particular field allowing you to complete projects faster and with a better quality output. However, while there are many benefits of outsourcing, there are several drawbacks and unique considerations depending on where and how the work is outsourced. Your company may run into communication issues around domain experience. In other words, if your chosen outsourcer is less familiar with your industry, you should allow extra time for some education. Traditional outsourcing business like accounting and law have overcome this challenge by setting up practices that specialize in vertical industries. The most obvious example is that of the outsourced team working in a different time zone with a significant language barrier. These communication risks become real as we look to an example of outsourcing, like offshoring. What is Offshoring? It's a common misconception that outsourcing and offshoring are the same things. They are not. The primary differentiator between outsourcing and offshoring is that offshoring is a type of outsourcing. Offshoring is when a business hires a third-party firm to perform work in a nation other than one where the business primarily conducts its operations. This business model developed from outsourcing, as companies looked for cheaper alternatives to services overseas, usually in a developing country such as India, Bangladesh, or Eastern Europe. While there are many reasons companies look to offshore their services, it mainly comes down to lower costs. As we have said, some of the most popular countries to offshore IT solutions and software needs are India, China, and Eastern Europe, just because they offer lower production costs due to lower local salaries and less stringent labor laws. Unfortunately, offshoring poses many risks. Working in different time zones, language and cultural barriers, cyber-security threats, political instability and intellectual property concerns are all challenges when working with a company located in another country. This misalignment may require some adjustments on your internal team's schedule, especially with time zones that could be well over 12 hours. You'll likely have to lengthen deadlines as work can take much longer with a team in remote parts of the world. Plus unless you find people in other countries who speak your native language fluently, you may run into language and understanding barriers, which could end up costing your company in delays. How does Nearshoring Work? Nearshoring is a subset of offshoring with the main differentiator being that the outside company is located a little bit closer to you, but still in another country. For example, a company located in New York City may outsource their work to an agency in Mexico or South America. When referring to nearshoring, the third-party companies will be in a closer time zone so that communication can happen either in real time or your schedules may only have to be altered a few hours. Closer time zones can help when it comes to collaboration and can allow for identifying problems faster. However, it's important to note that nearshoring isn't fool-proof and cannot overcome all the challenges that offshoring your work can present. It only solves the time zone issue. Even if the country is in a similar time zone, there may still be differences in holidays, language struggles, cultural misunderstandings, and geopolitical risks. Can Onshoring Benefit My Company? Onshoring is a unique outsourcing business model as it utilizes partners in the same country for increased efficiencies and productivity without the headaches of offshoring. As an advantageous and increasingly popular alternative to offshoring, onshoring is ideal for companies who are seeking outside resources but want the work produced closer to home enabling faster delivery of higher quality software. For example, a company in San Francisco may be looking for Sharepoint support but finds that a local provider's quotes are above their budget due to being located in such a high-priced area. To save money, they can onshore the work to a partner in a smaller city to produce a high-quality product without having to deal with the headaches, timeline issues, and questionable quality of offshore firms. Onshoring is beneficial for a variety of organizations as it breaks down barriers and hurdles that are typical of offshoring and nearshoring. As a result, companies can speed up deadlines and produce quality products – all while keeping costs lower than the resources in their local areas. Companies that seek out onshoring realize the benefits of real-time collaboration and enjoy working with a scalable network of qualified professionals who possess a breadth of knowledge and capabilities. Additionally, it's easier to explain to your partners your business problems and challenges, so there are no misinterpreted requirements, and you can feel confident in your partner's capabilities. Onshoring vs. Offshoring Once it comes to finding the solution to streamline internal teams and save money, it comes down to whether you want to offshore your projects or onshore your projects and what is ultimately best for your business. In comparison to offshoring, it's easier to see why onshoring is the smarter choice: • Offers similar teams regarding language and cultural barriers along with the ability to understand complex business problems. • Minimizes time zone concerns for improved collaboration and problem-solving • Allows for faster response time so that you can reduce delays • Lowers travel costs • Supports jobs within your county • Provides you with access to professionals with years of experience and a breadth of capabilities which are all focused on helping your business succeed The Shift to Onshoring in Recent Years While offshoring to India, South America, and Eastern Europe was a method of saving on labor costs, the shift in recent years has favored onshoring. In addition to more businesses realizing onshoring as a viable solution for improving quality and convenience, wages in some of the top offshoring locations, are rising with a shortage of capable talent. This lowers the labor savings associated with offshoring and without the advantage of cost savings, the disadvantages of outsourcing at such a physical and cultural distance aren't worth the headaches, delays, and hassle. Digital business is unforgiving. Commerce moves fast and does not stop to grant second chances, so it's no wonder more people are choosing to reshore their operations back to the United States to improve quality and convenience while still saving money over in-house teams. Rural Sourcing: Your Source for Onshoring Support Rural Sourcing is the leader in onshoring within the United States. Whether you are looking to build a new application, enhance a product, or scale your business intelligence, our team can help. With development centers located across the United States, you can access a network of people for specific projects or areas of focus that are most important to your business' success. You'll get the results you desire at the cost you can afford with onshoring services from Rural Sourcing. Onshoring Capabilities at Rural Sourcing At Rural Sourcing, we aim to provide cost-effective and convenient solutions to our partners across a variety of focus areas: • Application Development • Business Intelligence & Analytics • Cloud Solutions • Enterprise Applications • QA & Testing What sets us apart from other onshoring companies is that our teams are experts in modern application development, and no one is more expert in remote software delivery. We work hard with our community partners in the selection of our center locations and in bringing jobs and a positive culture to those communities, our colleagues, and our customers. With our extensive network of brains' trusts and experienced professionals, you'll tap into a valuable resource across a multitude of IT industries. Along with having an experienced team with a deep understanding of your field, we utilize state-of-the-art technology to meet the ever-changing and ever-increasing market demands. Contact Rural Sourcing to Learn More About our Onshoring IT Solutions In today's fast-paced world, your company can benefit from the experience, knowledge, and capabilities of an onshore team. Not only is it a faster alternative to offshoring, onshoring breaks down time zone, language, and cultural barriers that can delay deadlines, lengthen problem-solving timelines, and hurt your overall bottom line. Tapping a firm that's closer to your organization will reduce response time and allow you to take your product to market faster, so you can achieve your overarching goals quick. If you're ready to see if onshoring is right for you, contact Rural Sourcing. We've helped clients across the United States achieve their strategic goals with our unique IT solutions. Get in touch with us today to see how we can help your business.

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